Katrina Whitaker of Cary, lost control of her car on an icy patch of Morrisville Parkway early Friday morning, January 19, 2018 in Morrisville, NC. Her story has a happy ending and she has strong advice for drivers. Robert Willett rwillett@newsobserver.com
Katrina Whitaker of Cary, lost control of her car on an icy patch of Morrisville Parkway early Friday morning, January 19, 2018 in Morrisville, NC. Her story has a happy ending and she has strong advice for drivers. Robert Willett rwillett@newsobserver.com

Weather

Secondary roads, overnight refreezing are now the main concerns, NC Gov. Cooper says

By Aaron Moody

amoody@newsobserver.com

January 19, 2018 12:46 PM

Many of North Carolina’s main roads are mostly passable for drivers, but dangers remain as the leftovers from Winter Storm Inga melt and refreeze for the next couple of days.

The state of emergency issued Tuesday is still in effect until further notice, Gov. Roy Cooper said in an update at noon Friday.

Cooper asked people to stay off roads that still have snow and ice on them. Most of those are secondary roads, which is where transportation crews shifted their attention on Friday.

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But all roads are potentially dangerous, the governor said, mentioning two snow-related driving deaths – one Thursday in Washington County and another Friday morning in Durham.

“Tonight, temperatures will drop below freezing,” Cooper said. “Even roads that look clear can be dangerous tonight and in the morning.”

Transportation Secretary Jim Trogdon said that’s true even on primary roads that appear safe today.

A tow truck driver was killed on Miami Boulevard Friday morning. The tow truck was towing an SUV from an earlier accident when the driver apparently lost control of the tow truck. The truck went off the road and hit a large tree, the collision f Bernard Thomasbthomas@heraldsun.com

Snow banks alongside roadways from plowing operations will linger and take longer to melt, Trogdon said, refreezing and affecting driving.

“Particularly tonight and tomorrow morning, I would stress that everyone watch for these spot-icy locations across our state as you travel,” Trogdon said.

Lt. Col. Vic Ward of the State Highway Patrol also asked drivers to move over and give road crews the space they need to do their jobs safely.

North Carolina power outages which peaked at about 31,000 during the storm, were down to a couple hundred by Friday morning, Cooper said.

Watch the ABC11 weather forecast to see when the temperatures will rise and the snow will melt away. ABC11