This image released by CBS shows, from left, Norah O'Donnell, Charlie Rose and Gayle King on the set of "CBS This Morning." Rose's co-hosts on "CBS This Morning" sharply condemned their suspended colleague Tuesday, Nov. 21, 2017, after the airing of sexual misconduct allegations that included groping female staffers and walking around naked in front of them, saying that it's a time of reckoning in society. (CBS via AP) AP
This image released by CBS shows, from left, Norah O'Donnell, Charlie Rose and Gayle King on the set of "CBS This Morning." Rose's co-hosts on "CBS This Morning" sharply condemned their suspended colleague Tuesday, Nov. 21, 2017, after the airing of sexual misconduct allegations that included groping female staffers and walking around naked in front of them, saying that it's a time of reckoning in society. (CBS via AP) AP

Orange County

Should UNC kick Charlie Rose out of journalism hall of fame?

By Joe Johnson

jjohnson@heraldsun.com

November 22, 2017 06:00 AM

CHAPEL HILL

Charlie Rose has put the N.C. Journalism Hall of Fame in a tough spot.

Allegations of sexual misconduct by the renowned broadcast journalist surfaced about Rose, prompting CBS to fire him and PBS to stop running the “Charlie Rose” show Tuesday. Eight women have come forward to accuse Rose of unwanted advances and lewd behavior while working for and with him.

“This is an unprecedented incident for the Hall of Fame,” said Kyle York, assistant to the dean for communications at the UNC School of Media and Journalism. “The revelations involving Charlie Rose are disturbing, and we take them very seriously. Because of the seriousness of the matter, we need to be thoughtful and deliberative about the actions we take with regard to Charlie Rose and the Hall of Fame.”

UNC isn’t the only institution studying the Rose matter.

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Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, which honored Rose with the Walter Cronkite Award for Excellence in Journalism in 2015, is considering revoking the award, according to a report Tuesday by azcentral.com

A statement from ASU called the reports of Rose’s behavior “deeply troubling.”

“Effective immediately, his show is off the Arizona PBS airwaves, and will remain so indefinitely,” the statement said. “Meanwhile, we are seeking more information and evaluating his receipt of the 2015 Cronkite Award,” the statement said.

Rose, a 1999 N.C. Journalism Hall of Fame inductee, was born in Henderson. He is a 1964 graduate of Duke University and a 1968 graduate of the Duke School of Law.

According to his N.C. Journalism Hall of Fame bio, Rose began his career in 1972 as a reporter for WPIX-TV in New York City. In 1974, he became managing editor of the PBS series “Bill Moyers’ International Report,” and in 1975 Moyers named him executive producer of “Bill Moyers’ Journal.” The next year Rose became the correspondent for “USA: People and Politics,” another Moyers project. “A Conversation with Jimmy Carter,” one installment of that series, won a 1976 Peabody Award.

In 1978, Rose got his own talk show on KXAS-TV in Dallas-Fort Worth. Three years later, “The Charlie Rose Show” moved to an NBC-owned station in Washington, D.C., WRC-TV.

From 1983 to 1990, Rose anchored the CBS-TV network’s “Nightwatch,” a late-night interview show broadcast five times a week.

In 1991, his current show “Charlie Rose” launched and aired five times a week on 215 PBS stations until it was suspended Monday.

In recent years, Rose hosted “CBS This Morning” each weekday and contributed to “60 Minutes.” His arrival on the panel with “CBS This Morning” is credited with an improvement in ratings for the show.

Rose, an Emmy Award winner, had spent more than 25 years setting a high standard for informed and revealing interviews. He is known for exploring the lives of leading political, social and artistic figures from around the world.

Joe Johnson: 919-419-6678, @JEJ_HSNews