Brothers who fled Mexico as teens deported by Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Colin Warren-Hicks

December 05, 2017 01:46 PM

The daughters, Stephanie Delgado-Garcia, left, and Yhairi Delgado-Garcia, of two brothers facing deportation, Jose and Dario Delgado Arroyo, speak to television reporters during a protest outside the office of U.S. Rep. G.K. Butterfield on Thursday, Nov. 30, 2017, in Durham, NC. Casey Toth ctoth@heraldsun.com
The daughters, Stephanie Delgado-Garcia, left, and Yhairi Delgado-Garcia, of two brothers facing deportation, Jose and Dario Delgado Arroyo, speak to television reporters during a protest outside the office of U.S. Rep. G.K. Butterfield on Thursday, Nov. 30, 2017, in Durham, NC. Casey Toth ctoth@heraldsun.com
DURHAM

Jose Delgado Arroyo, 38, of Durham, and Dario Delgado Arroyo, 36, of Wake County, have been deported.

Bryan Cox, a spokesman for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), confirmed that the two brothers were “removed” back to Mexico on Monday.

Jose and Dario Delgado Arroyo went to a check-in appointment with federal immigration officials in Charlotte Nov. 17 – when they were both detained.

“They were taken into custody after the immigration courts denied their request for stay of removal,” Cox said. “So, at this point, there are no legal impediments to their removal.”

The brothers were first held at Folkston ICE Processing Center in Folkston, Georgia, before being moved to Otero County Processing Center in Chaparral, New Mexico.

On Nov. 28, the brothers’ 14-year-old daughters, Stephanie and Yhairi Delgado-Garcia, sought to bring attention to their family’s situation. Stephanie organized an hours-long walk-out at Hillside High. Yhairi did the same at Garner High.

The teenagers and the advocacy group Alerta Migratoria have contended the brothers had inadequate legal representation and should have been allowed to stay in the United States to continue providing for their nine children, including four with medical issues.

After staging the walk-outs at their respective high schools, the teens, along with their supporters including Alerta Migratoria, held a press conference outside U.S. Rep. G.K. Butterfield’s office in Durham to state their case and gain further political support. At the time, a congressional aide told their group that Butterfield was doing the best he could.

A representative of Alerta Migratoria said the brothers fled Michoacán, Mexico, when they were 13 and 14 because of their father’s political beliefs.

Colin Warren-Hicks: 919-419-6636, @CWarrenHicks

Virginia Bridges: 919-829-8924, @virginiabridges